Definitive Glutes Guide

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glutes-guide

If you have been around Unorthodox Training before you will know that we have done some massive articles in the past which we often refer to as definitive guides and whatnot. This is because we combine massive amounts of information backed by scientific studies and experts in the field that the article is created on. Today is no different as we have prepared this Glutes guide for helping people develop their glutes.

best-glutes-exercises

How to Get Your Glutes to Work (3 BEST Exercises For Glutes Activation)

Do you have trouble feeling your glutes during workouts? Don’t be concerned. In this article, I’ll go through a four-step method for activating your glutes.

Your buttocks house your body’s largest and most strong muscles. It primarily serves as a support system and a shock absorber for the entire body. And plays a significant role in the generation of strength and force in many movements. Not only that, but well-developed glutes are attractive to both men and women. And, for the males out there, we have insider assurance that chicks notice your buttocks. What is the current issue? We have a habit of sitting for long periods of time. This is a terrific technique to “forget” how to stimulate your glutes. This is especially true if you do nothing to counteract it.

And for some people, this can be an issue. Why? Because gluteal suppression and prolonged sitting might result in lower back and/or hip pain. This exacerbates the whole condition. As a defensive mechanism, your body will tend to avoid activating the glutes in response to any lower body pain or injury, according to research. And it is common for the body to recall this pattern long after the pain or damage has been cured. And will continue to impede the glutes.

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What You Should Know About “Gluteal Amnesia”

Dr. Stuart McGill, a world-renowned spinal researcher, has conducted substantial research on this subject. This syndrome is known as “gluteal amnesia.”

The fundamental issue here is that your body adjusts when you “forget” how to use your glutes due to inactivity or injury. So now, when you’re squatting, deadlifting, or doing any hip extension activity (where your glutes are intended to assist), other muscles will take over. Often, the hamstrings and lower back bear the brunt of the added strain. This prevents the growth of your glutes. And it isn’t only that! This is also why we frequently encounter the combination of weak glutes, tight hamstrings, and lower back pain. It can even progress to the point where ordinary actions requiring hip extension, such as walking or jogging, cause lower back pain. That’s because the glutes are practically deactivated.

So, to cut a long tale short, your glutes are crucial. And there are four major markers we may look at to see whether your glutes do need some treatment.

“Do I Have Gluteal Amnesia?” questionnaire Test

The gluteal amnesia symptoms listed below can assist you to determine whether or not you’ve forgotten how to stimulate your glutes.

1st test:

First, do you have trouble feeling your glutes working or contracting during lower-body exercises? Do your lower back and hamstrings tense instead? Then this is a good indication that your glutes aren’t working as well as they should.

Test No. 2:

Second, do a single leg glute bridge as follows:

One leg should be straight, while the other should be bowed on the floor.

Maintain this posture with your hips in the air.

Do your hamstrings, lower back, or quads feel stronger than your glutes? This is an indicator that your glutes aren’t doing their job during hip extension.

3rd test:

Third, do you have an anterior pelvic tilt posture when you look at yourself from the side? Then your glutes are most likely failing to lift your pelvis into a neutral position because they are weak.

4th test:

Finally, do you spend most of your day sitting? And do you suffer from what I’ll label “flat butt syndrome”? Then your glutes are probably in need of some attention.

How to Get Your Glutes to Work

Have you tested positive for one or more of these four indicators? Or would you simply like to see better results from your glutes training? Then it’s time to work on waking up those glutes.

And to do so, we’ll employ a four-step method in this post. We’ll be able to gradually get your glutes firing harder and harder with a few everyday exercises. You should be able to use your glutes anytime you walk, move, or perform your lifts. Instead of compensating with your lower back or other muscles and working extra as a result.

Contraction is the first step.

The first thing we want to do is get you to understand what a glute contraction feels like. And connecting your brain to your muscle.

So, to begin:

Simply sit and place your hands under each butt cheek.

Then, contract each of your glutes one at a time.

You should be able to feel those glute muscles firing when you contract them one at a time with your hands.

Once you’ve mastered it, we’ll go on to a kneeling position. Engage your core this time and lay your palm on the glute of the down leg. Try to flex it as much as possible. You should be able to feel the contraction with your hand and see your glute change shape as you do so. Continue to work until you achieve this.

We’ll go on to step 2 after you’ve completed a few sets of each of these and are able to successfully contract your glutes in each of those positions. That’s where we’ll start with exercising our glutes against gravity.

Step 2: Initiation

We’ll do this with two basic exercises. These are the exercises that Dr. Stuart McGill discovered to be the greatest options for glute activation after 30+ years of significant lab and experimental research.

Dr. Stuart McGill was nice enough to personally coach me through each of these exercises, explaining the setup and numerous signals that he discovered to work best to enhance glute activation. All of this was based on his years of investigation.

As I go through each workout, I’ll summarize them.

Glutamine Bridges

The glute bridge is the initial move, and it targets the largest of your glute muscles, the gluteus maximus. For these, see:

To begin, lie on your back with your knees bent.

Maintain a firm core. And, without arching your lower back, pinch your buttocks to engage them first.

Then, while keeping your glutes engaged, rise up.

Squeeze your glutes as hard as you can at the top for around 5 seconds before descending.

If this alone does not adequately activate your glutes and you feel it more in your hamstrings, you can try the following cues:

First, imagine you’re holding a $100 dollar between your butt cheeks. So, in order to keep that $100, tighten your glutes throughout each rep. You want to keep that bill from falling.

Thinking about driving your heels into the ground causes the hamstrings to contract more. Instead, consider pushing your feet away from you. Push your feet forward as if you were attempting a knee extension. If you need something to push against, you can do these against a wall. This activates the quads and, as a result of a notion known as reciprocal inhibition, decreases the activation of the hamstrings, forcing the glutes to do the job.

Finally, if necessary, place a mini-band around the knees. This can help increase activation because your knees will have to actively employ your glutes to maintain them apart as you complete the movement.

So, experiment with these numerous cues and employ them as needed to enhance glute activation.

Clam Shells

Clam shells will be utilized next to target another crucial glute muscle, the gluteus medius. For these, see:

Lay on your side, knees and hips bent.

Make a pillow for your head with one arm.

Then, with your other hand, press your thumb against the bone in front of your hip.

Wrap your other fingers around the top of your buttocks. This is the glute medius muscle, and you should feel it functioning as you perform the next movement.

Next, with your feet together and your core braced, open up your top knee like a clam shell so that your upper leg’s knee rises towards the ceiling.

Maintaining core bracing can help you avoid twisting your hips as you open up your top knee. Again, when you execute each rep, use your fingers to compress the glute medius.

And what about the sets and reps for these exercises? Dr. Stuart McGill suggests three sets of ten exercises. However, each rep should be done thoughtfully and with robust glute engagement.

Step 3: Resistance/Load Progression

Once you’ve gotten your glutes “back on” and your hamstrings and lower back feel a little better as a result, you’ll want to start gradually testing your glutes with increased resistance and new movement patterns.

To that end, Dr. Stuart McGill proposes three exercises based on his study and expertise.

Step-Ups to the Side

This is a terrific low-impact workout for challenging the glutes in many planes. To advance, pull your leg up at the top and hold this position for 1-2 seconds.

Squat with a Goblet

The goblet squat comes next. This will be employed to teach your glutes how to operate in tandem with your other lower body muscles during a squat movement pattern. Using the cues provided below, try a “weight shift” phase in which you descend to roughly a third of the way down, hold this position, and then slowly shift your weight from one foot to the other side to side. This movement will serve to challenge all of the gluteal neuromuscular compartments.

Pull-Throughs for Cables

Finally, we’ll employ cable pull-throughs to teach the glutes and hamstrings how to work in a hinge pattern. This will efficiently transfer to actions such as the deadlift. It’s also an excellent method to begin incorporating the glutes into activities that generate power and force.

These exercises are critical for instilling in your glutes the ability to collaborate with your other muscles in a variety of movement patterns. Then, ultimately, you’ll be able to undertake more challenging exercises like split squats, barbell squats, and deadlifts with increasing weight, but this time with your glutes actually doing what they should be doing rather than having other muscles compensate. Prioritize focusing on these progressions till then.

Step 4: Preventative measures

Finally, while the preceding procedures are likely to be successful, it is critical that we do not neglect a probable root cause of all of this – excessive sitting. This is where step 4 comes in. This is when precaution comes into play. Avoid sitting for long periods of time if you aren’t exercising your glutes at all. Instead, get up and go for a walk or stretch at least every 30 minutes of sitting. Even better, during your breaks, do what I’ll refer to as a “wake up” exercise for your glutes.

Toe raises, for example, are a terrific focused exercise in which you point your toes outwards.

Squeeze your quadriceps.

Then, while clenching your glutes, lift up to the balls of your feet.

Hold for 5 seconds, then lower and repeat for a total of 10 reps. Finally, if necessary, place a mini-band around the knees. This can help increase activation because your knees will have to actively employ your glutes to maintain them apart as you complete the movement.

So, experiment with these numerous cues and employ them as needed to enhance glute activation.

This is only a simple workout to maintain your brain in the habit of understanding how to fire and use your glutes effectively throughout the day.

To Activate Glutes, Follow These Steps: here’s the action plan to stimulate your glutes.

develop-strengthen-glutes

Perform the two activation exercises, the glute bridge and the clam shell, at least once a day with the reps and sets listed below. Then, in addition to this, you should include one “wake up” activity, such as toe lifts, that you can practice throughout the day to break up your sitting periods.

GLUTE ACTIVITY EXERCISE DAILY MOVEMENTS:

Glutamine Bridges (3 sets of 10 reps with 5 second pause at top)

Shells of Clams (3 sets of 10 reps per side)

Exercising to Wake Up (10 reps with 5 second holds, done 3-5 times throughout the day)

As your glute activation improves and you’ve had success with the progression exercises, you’ll eventually reach a point where these daily glute exercises are no longer necessary. This is because your main lower body activities will allow you to engage, strengthen, and increase your glutes to a far higher extent. But, in order to get there, it’s critical that you stick to the plan we’ve laid out.

The 4 BEST Glutes Workouts Featuring Bret Contreras (GYM OR HOME)

Do you have trouble building and strengthening your glutes? Here are the four finest glutes exercises for a rounder, stronger buttock.

The glutes are a powerful collection of muscles that play an important part in a variety of activities. And, of course, when they’re properly developed, they just look good. Both on men and women. They are, however, a muscle group that many people struggle with developing and strengthening. This has the potential to cause difficulties and imbalances in other parts of the body. It can also result in the infamous pancake butt.

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For Best Results, Use a Variety of Glutes Exercises.

So, how do you go about fixing this? How can you get the most out of your glutes? The first step is to recognize that they are intended to accomplish more than squat and deadlift. The truth is that by performing the appropriate glutes exercises, you can experience significantly more overall growth and strength in the many regions and muscles that comprise the glutes. To be sure, the optimal glute exercises will differ from person to person. This is only a simple workout to maintain your brain in the habit of understanding how to fire and use your glutes effectively throughout the day.

To Activate Glutes, Follow These Steps: Summary So, to summarize, here’s the action plan to stimulate your glutes.

Perform the two activation exercises, the glute bridge and the clam shell, at least once a day with the reps and sets listed below. Then, in addition to this, you should include one “wake up” activity, such as toe lifts, that you can practice throughout the day to break up your sitting periods.

GLUTE ACTIVITY EXERCISE DAILY MOVEMENTS:

Glutamine Bridges (3 sets of 10 reps with 5 second pause at top)

Shells of Clams (3 sets of 10 reps per side)

Exercising to Wake Up (10 reps with 5 second holds, done 3-5 times throughout the day)

As your glute activation improves and you’ve had success with the progression exercises, you’ll eventually reach a point where these daily glute exercises are no longer necessary. This is because your main lower body activities will allow you to engage, strengthen, and increase your glutes to a far higher extent. But, in order to get there, it’s critical that you stick to the plan we’ve laid out.

The 4 BEST Glutes Workouts Featuring Bret Contreras (GYM OR HOME)

Do you have trouble building and strengthening your glutes? Here are the four finest glutes exercises for a rounder, stronger buttock.

The glutes are a powerful collection of muscles that play an important part in a variety of activities. And, of course, when they’re properly developed, they just look good. Both on men and women. They are, however, a muscle group that many people struggle with developing and strengthening. This has the potential to cause difficulties and imbalances in other parts of the body. It can also result in the infamous pancake butt.

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For Best Results, Use a Variety of Glutes Exercises.

So, how do you go about fixing this? How can you get the most out of your glutes? The first step is to recognize that they are intended to accomplish more than squat and deadlift. The truth is that by performing the appropriate glutes exercises, you can experience significantly more overall growth and strength in the many regions and muscles that comprise the glutes. To be sure, the optimal glute exercises will differ from person to person.

The Best Glutes Exercises Are Divided Into Four Major Groups

However, in general, if we want to maximize glute development, we should train them with at least one exercise from each of the four categories listed below. This is true for both men and women.

Thrust/bridge workout – Strengthen both the upper and lower glutes. When the glutes are fully tensed, they experience the greatest level of tension.

Exercise that emphasizes the lower glutes and quadriceps is the squat/lunge. When the glutes are fully stretched, this position puts the most strain on them.

Hinge/pull exercise focuses on the lower glutes and hamstrings.

The abduction movement primarily targets the gluteus medius, which stresses the upper glutes. This is a muscle that is frequently overlooked.

Choosing the Best Glutes Exercises from Each Category

Choosing an activity from each of these four areas aids in total glute development. And complete leg development! What are the greatest glutes exercises for each of these categories? Individually, this will vary, but some solutions are simply superior to others.

And we’ll rely on the knowledge of Bret Contreras, dubbed the Glute Guy, to assist us choose an appropriate workout for each of these categories. A well-known published researcher and author who has studied the glutes for over 20 years. And was the one who popularized the hip thrust in the first place!

Here’s what he suggested.

Thrust/Bridge (Category 1)

Joe: So, Bret, we’re going with the first option, a gluteal thrust or bridge action. What do you think would be a useful exercise to include here?

Bret: Hip thrust with a pause at the top would be my choice for that category.

Joe: And, in terms of execution, what signals and form advice can you provide to help maximize glute activation with this movement?

Bret: There are two general approaches to the hip thrust. The PPT technique is one of them. Looking down, scooping the weight up, and posteriorly tilting the pelvis into lockout.

The hinge approach is another option. Think of the head, neck, and torso as a solid, straight unit at this point. With the head, neck, and torso all in place. Looking down from the bottom position, then up from the top position. Maintaining neutrality in the back.

At lockout, you should have a horizontal torso. Hips should be neutral or posteriorly inclined, and glutes should be squeezed tightly. You also want vertical shins at the top, which can be achieved by not putting your feet too close or too far apart.

Joe: Okay, I understand. So the knees were packed above the heels. At the highest position, avoid overextending. And at the peak, I concentrate on squeezing my glutes as hard as I can.

Yes, Bret. The most important thing to remember is to prevent overextending and excessive anterior pelvic tilt.

If you don’t have access to equipment, perform the single-leg hip thrust.

And what if you’re working out at home with little equipment? The single-leg hip thrust is a good option that Bret suggests. Place your back on a bench, couch, or another elevated surface. And for this movement, you’ll want to use the “hinge” technique. While Bret previously stated, you should concentrate on keeping your head, neck, and torso in alignment and neutral as you perform each rep.

Squat/Lunge (Category 2)

Joe: What would you propose for the squat lunge action for the lower glutes and quads?

Bret: So, according to Dr. Brad Schoenfeld’s research, mechanical stress is the most crucial component of hypertrophy. However, metabolic stress and muscular injury are likely to play a role. The hip thrust creates a lot of mechanical tension. In addition, there is a lot of metabolic stress. However, you don’t get deep and don’t get much gluteal flexibility.

Walking dumbbell lunges provide a significantly deeper stretch in the glutes. Furthermore, the walking lunge is the most challenging in the stretched position at the bottom. At the peak position during lockout, the hip thrust is the most difficult. As a result, the walking lunge will cause more muscular damage.

Joe: What are some advice you’d give for this movement in terms of form and execution?

Bret: You want to do the lunges in a way that emphasizes the glutes. Instead of: Taking too short of a stride – which will put additional strain on the quads OR

Taking too long a stride – This can put greater strain on the hamstrings…

Take a stride length that allows your shin angle to be slightly forward at the bottom of the movement. So that the front of your knee matches the front of your shoes. That is the form that I believe increases glute activation. You’ll also tilt slightly forward with your torso. But not too much (about a 20-degree torso tilt, rather than a 45-degree lean).

Also, avoid having the hips fly up and turning this into a “Good Morning” exercise by pressing through the heel.

Perform the Deficit Reverse Lunge. If You Don’t Have Any Equipment

A potential home option for individuals with limited equipment would be the deficit reverse lunge. This is where you elevate your front foot onto any elevated platform and conduct it similarly to how Bret described the dumbbell walking lunge.

Hinge/Pull (Category 3)

Joe: The hinge or pull exercise for the lower glutes and hamstrings comes next. What would you recommend in this situation?

Bret: The 45-degree hyperextension is my preference. When I started conducting EMG research, I was astounded by how high glute activation was. However, because the knees are straight, you get very high hamstring activation, and the knees are in a much better position to deliver force when compared to a thrust or bridge. It’s also a highly safe practice. You don’t acquire nearly as many injuries with this activity. As a result, you can perform them on a regular basis without concern.

Joe: And I’ve seen that carrying out this practice appears to be difficult for a lot of people. Is there anything you can suggest to help clear things up?

Bret: There are two ways we accomplish things. The first is the neutral-neutral. Neutral feet and spine. That will truly work the hamstrings, glutes, and erectors.

However, if you want to bias the glutes, you should totally round over at the spine. This disables the erectors (lower back), making it a glutes/hamstring movement. Turning the feet out to 45 degrees also increases glute activation. When people try the rounded back method, they will notice that their glutes exhaust first in a back extension.

If you don’t have access to equipment, perform the reverse hyperextensions (bench/countertop).

Joe: And, in terms of alternatives, this one appears to be a little difficult to replace at home. But do you think reverse hyperextensions performed on a bench or perhaps a tabletop would be appropriate?

Bret: Yup. Make sure you do it in a regulated manner. Straight legs are possible if you have a tall surface. The spread eagle approach is one of my favorites. Begin narrow at the bottom and broaden at the top. You can still do them if you have a low bench, such as after a bench press. However, you would just bend your legs at the bottom and kick your legs at the top.

Abduction is the fourth category.

Joe: Finally, we have the upper glute abduction movement. What kind of exercise would you recommend in this situation? And how do we go about carrying it out?

Bret: Okay, so I went with the bodyweight side-lying hip lift. What’s nice about this is that it’s done with your own body weight and can be done anywhere. This will strike the upper glutes. When you reach the bottom of the exercise, it will strike the entire gluteus maximus (gluteus maximus and gluteus medius). When you get to the top, it will focus more on the gluteus medius (upper glutes).

To accomplish this, first:

Begin in a side plank position on your elbow, hips and knees on the ground.

Then you push through the grounded knee, as tall as you can, with the goal of achieving maximum hip separation.

When you’re at the peak, press your hips forward, and when you’re at the bottom, sink your hips back.

This will be felt strongly in the glutes. Perform three sets of 12 repetitions at a controlled tempo. After three sets of this, my glutes are on fire.

If you don’t have access to equipment, perform the seated banded hip abductions.

The seated banded hip abductions are a terrific alternative for this and a motion advised by Bret. It’s one of the most effective glute isolation exercises available. Wrap a mini-band around your knees and push your knees out using your upper glutes for 10 reps. Perform 10-15 reps with your back straight up, 10-15 reps with your back hunched over, and 10-15 reps with your back leaning. These diverse positions will simply aid to activate different fibres and regions of your glutes.

Best Glutes Exercises Summary (With Sets And Reps)

To summarize, here are the finest glutes strengthening and building exercises with repetitions and sets for each of the four categories:

Thrust/Bridge Classification (Upper & Lower Glutes)

Barbell Is Paused 4 sets of 8 reps of hip thrust (with 3s pause)

Single Leg Hip Thrust Squat/Lunge Category (Lower Glutes + Quads) as an alternative

DB on the move 3 sets of 20 reps of the lunge (10 steps each leg)

Deficit DB is an alternative. Category: Reverse Lunge Hinge/Pull (Lower Glutes + Hamstrings)

3 sets of 15 reps of DB 45 degree hyperextension

Reverse Hyperextensions Abduction is an alternative (Upper Glutes)

3 sets of 12 reps on the side lying hip raise

Takeaway = Seated Banded Hip Abduction Alternative

You can incorporate these exercises into your weekly regimen as needed, or you can do them as a comprehensive lower body workout on their own. But, perhaps, you can see that in order to accelerate your results and train efficiently, you must pay particular attention not only to the exercises you include in your regimen, but also to how you perform them.

Visit bretcontreras.com to learn more about his work and the numerous programs he provides.

The Best Glutes Workout (GYM OR HOME!) To Grow Your Flat Buttocks

No longer will you have to deal with a flat buttock. In this article, I discuss the butt workout you should be performing for a perky butt (including 6 of the greatest glute exercises available).

I’m going to teach you a glutes workout that includes 6 of the finest exercises for growing your buttocks. Here’s what I’m going to do:

The science behind developing your glutes (the two muscles you should focus on) Exact glute exercises you can do at home or at the gym with weights to increase your buttocks

Your butt will be booty-full by the end of this piece.

Your Glute Muscles’ Anatomy

glute-muscle-anatomy

If you want to know how to acquire a larger butt (and fast), you must first understand the muscles involved. The glutes are made up of three major muscles, two of which you should concentrate on:

Glute max: The largest, most noticeable, and strongest glute muscle. Its principal role is to propel your hips forward (otherwise known as hip extension).

Glute medius: The second largest glute muscle in your body, positioned on the sidewalls of your upper buttocks. It helps to maintain our hips aligned when we move, allowing the glute max to do its function. It also has the unique ability to move your thigh away from your body’s midline (i.e. hip abduction).

The first, second, and final exercises in the butt workout I’ll go over below will all target the glute max in three different ways. As a superset, the third and fourth movements will target the glute medius.

Let’s get started!

Exercise 1: Glute-Focused Deadlift

Because it primarily requires moving your hips forward, the deadlift will be our major heavy exercise for the glute max (i.e. hip extension). However, there are a few adjustments we’ll need to make to guarantee that your glutes are performing the majority of the work. Do you only have dumbbells? Don’t be concerned. Many of the following changes can still be made in the same way.

How to Do a Glute-Focused Deadlift in a Butt Workout

To begin, we’ll take a hip-width foot stance with the toes slightly turned outwards. This is significant because if your stance is overly wide (as with a sumo deadlift), you will reduce your range of motion. As a result, your glutes’ ability to drive your hips forward is limited.

Squeeze your glutes and drive your knees out against your elbows once you’re in the deadlift posture. You should feel more of your glute muscles ‘switch on’ as a result of this.

To stand up, anchor your core, tuck your chin, and push your feet into the floor WHILE thrusting your hips forward. To move the weight up, you must adjust your mindset from “pulling the bar up” to “pushing the floor away” with your legs AND “driving your hips forward.”

This ensures that the weight is moved by your glutes rather than your lower back. We’ll reverse the motion on the way down.

Lower the bar by pushing your hips back with your knees slightly bent. However, simply push your hips back as far as they will go before your lower back begins to round. If you don’t, the tension will migrate from your glutes to your lower back.

As you lower the bar, you should feel a deep stretch in your glutes and hamstrings. Squat the bar till it is barely past your knees, then reset. Instead, why not use dumbbells? Instead of falling all the way down to the floor, you’ll want to pause just past your knees before coming back up. Perform three sets of six hard reps, with three to four minutes of rest between each set.

Glute-Focused Walking Lunges (Exercise 2)

We’ll now move on to the second exercise in your butt workout: glute-focused walking lunges. This will still put a strain on the glute max. However, it will introduce a new balance demand on the glutes that you would not feel with deadlifts.

Our preferred workout will be bodyweight walking lunges. But, once again, we’ll add a few changes (3 in total) to make it more effective than a conventional lunge.

First, we’ll position your body so that your glutes, rather than your quads, bear the majority of the tension. You can accomplish it by bending slightly forward with your upper body while keeping your head in line with your torso. And you’ll want to keep that posture when you lunge.

Instead of merely stepping “up” after each lunge, consider stepping “forward.” As you perform each step, this little shift in thought will move more tension to your glutes rather than your quadriceps. To propel and drag yourself forward, use your front leg. Imagine a thin wall of glass in front of you, and you’re attempting to lunge through it.

The third change is more difficult to implement. However, it will aid in putting additional stretch on the glutes in the bottom position. As a result, they must work harder to return you to your starting position. To put the final touch on things, do the following:

Take your hands and provide some effort to guide your front knee inwards at the bottom of each lunge.

Then, when you rise up, push your leg back against your resistant hand.

Perform two sets of ten reps on each leg, with a two-minute break in between.

Glute Medius Kickbacks + Rear Foot Elevated Split Squats (Exercises 3 & 4) (Superset)

Next, in our butt workout, we’ll target the gluteus medius with a superset exercise that involves performing two exercises back-to-back without rest. Coach Paul Carter originally introduced me to this superset.

Glute Medius Kickbacks in Your Butt Workout: How to Grow Your Glutes

The glute medius kickback is the first exercise we’ll do. It’s a slow, controlled movement with a limited range of motion. But believe me when I say that it will ensure that tension is directed on your glutes rather than your lower back.

To do glute medius kickbacks, do the following:

Reduce the cable setting to its smallest and wrap the strap around your ankle. Do you lack access to a cable? Instead, you can use a band wrapped across both legs or looped over a fixture.

Once you’re set up, grab a pole or any ficture for balance.

Maintain a straight torso, tuck your chin, and brace your core.

Sweep your heel back but also out to the side at a 30-degree angle (remember: your glute medius performs the specific function of bringing the leg away from the body)

Only go as far as you can without arching your back. Alternatively, significantly leaning to the left or right.

If you do it correctly, you should feel a good burn in the upper/side area of your buttocks. Perform 12 reps on each side. Then, proceed to the next exercise: rear foot elevated split squats (RFESS). This exercise will likewise train the glute medius, but it will do so by forcing you to move while keeping your hips and knees balanced.

Rear Foot Elevated Split Squats: How to Do Them

The RFESS (Rear Foot Elevated Split Squats) is performed as follows:

Using a pair of dumbbells, raise your back leg onto a platform or stack of books.

Get into a split stance with the leg you just worked with in the previous exercise in front of you.

Maintain around 80% of your weight in your front leg and the remaining 20% in your back leg for balance (like a kickstand)

Tuck your chin and bend your torso over, exactly as we did with the glute-focused lunges earlier.

Drop your rear knee toward the ground from there. For greater gluteal involvement: As you lower yourself, keep your front leg’s shin straight up over your foot (rather than bending it forward).

At the bottom, use your front leg to propel yourself back up.

Repeat for a total of 12 repetitions.

Once finished, repeat the first superset with the other leg on both exercises.

Then you’ll repeat it two more times for a total of three supersets for each leg.

45° Hip Extension (Exercise 5)

Your glutes were tested the most in our deadlift and lunges at the bottom position. The glutes are fully stretched at this point. This is one method of stimulating growth. However, there is another technique to accelerate growth: by performing workouts that are most difficult at the top position. The glutes are fully engaged at this point.

This is when our previous move comes into play. I’ll show you a gym version and a home version so you may choose which one you like. The 45° hip extension is the gym variation. We’ll employ a few technique pointers from a recent article I wrote with the help of glutes researcher Bret Contreras to enhance glute activation:

Set up the pad so that it is slightly below your hips; this maximizes gluteal range of motion.

To bring yourself down, brace your core, tuck your chin, and then bend at the hips.

Consider two spots at the top and bottom of your buttocks. Squeeze your buttocks hard to connect these two spots and lift yourself up.

When done correctly, you should feel a significant contraction in your glutes at the peak.

And now we come to the home version (exercise 6). It will only take a stack of books:

Place your back flat against the floor.

Place one foot on the stack of books while keeping the other leg straight.

Push up against the book stack while elevating the opposing leg to 90 degrees. Avoid arching your back excessively when you do so. Maintain a straight line with your body.

Hold this top position for 1-2 seconds while squeezing your planted leg’s glute forcefully.

Rep for three sets of 15 repetitions on each leg.

And also, congratulations! You’ve just completed a fantastic booty-building butt workout.

The Best Butt Workout to Increase Glutes

The Most Effective Glutes Workout

3 sets of 6 reps of Glute-Focused Deadlift

Walking Lunges with Glute Focus (bodyweight): 2 sets of 10 reps each leg

3 sets of 12 repetitions each leg in a superset

Kickbacks on Glute Meds

RFESS

3 sets of 15 reps of 45° hip extension OR single leg elevated glute bridge

Wrap-Up

You should do this glutes workout once a week. If you choose, you can incorporate these exercises into your other workouts throughout the week. In any case, I hope you can see the value in carefully picking your workouts and completing them in a way that maximizes growth for the target muscle.

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